nprbooks:

“In some ways, I think it’s the closest that we come to the truth — is in the form of fiction.”

Laila Lalami explains why she chose to write about Estebanico, a slave and explorer from the 16th century, in the form of fiction rather than nonfiction.

Estebanico was a Moroccan slave on the ill-fated Narvaez Expedition. He was one of only 4 men to survive out of a party of 600. 

"I came across this mention of this expedition and of the fact that this Moroccan slave was said to be the first African explorer of America," Lalami tells NPR’s Arun Rath. "And I was Moroccan and I thought, ‘Well, how come I’ve never heard of him?’ "

Lalami’s new book, a fictional memoir from Estebanico’s point of view, is called The Moor’s Tale.

Shin Pond, Maine — near Baxter State Park, and where I learned to swim (and later became a junior lifeguard). This was an every-summer staple of life from about age 5 to age 17.

Shin Pond, Maine — near Baxter State Park, and where I learned to swim (and later became a junior lifeguard). This was an every-summer staple of life from about age 5 to age 17.

Over Nevada, early morning.

rawsonjustwontshutup:

“Did you ever, in that wonderland wilderness of adolesence [sic] ever, quite unexpectedly, see something, a dusk sky, a wild bird, a landscape, so exquisite terror touched you at the bone? And you are afraid, terribly afraid the smallest movement, a leaf, say, turning in the wind, will shatter all? That is, I think, the way love is, or should be: one lives in beautiful terror.”
― Truman Capote

rawsonjustwontshutup:

“Did you ever, in that wonderland wilderness of adolesence [sic] ever, quite unexpectedly, see something, a dusk sky, a wild bird, a landscape, so exquisite terror touched you at the bone? And you are afraid, terribly afraid the smallest movement, a leaf, say, turning in the wind, will shatter all? That is, I think, the way love is, or should be: one lives in beautiful terror.”

― Truman Capote